We Need To Talk

For centuries we’ve been taught to focus on our migraine attacks instead of the underlying condition. We’re left wondering if we’re doing something wrong. And we’re hesitant to speak up.

It’s time to give people with migraine a voice.
It’s time to paint a real picture of migraine.

Joel G.

162 migraine-affected days per year

Joel G., Kristen G., Monica M., Erica C., Jason G. are actual migraine patients.
They have been compensated for their time
Joel G., Kristen G., Monica M., Erica C., Jason G. are actual migraine patients.
They have been compensated for their time

We Need To Talk

For centuries we’ve been taught to focus on our migraine attacks instead of the underlying condition. We’re left wondering if we’re doing something wrong. And we’re hesitant to speak up.

It’s time to give people with migraine a voice.
It’s time to paint a real picture of migraine.

It’s time to turn private pain into collective change.

What’s SpeakYourMigraine.com?

This website gives people with migraine and their supporters useful stories, tools, and resources for thinking about migraine, and ultimately, having a more productive conversation about it.

Kristen Green: 188 migraine-affected days per year

Kristen G.

188 migraine-affected days per year

What’s SpeakYourMigraine.com?

This website gives people with migraine and their supporters useful stories, tools, and resources for thinking about migraine, and ultimately, having a more productive conversation about it.

Our participants have shared their real stories of life with migraine in hopes that others will find the words to share their own stories with their doctors, employers, family and friends. They are parents, students, workers, world travelers, writers, entrepreneurs and animal rescuers. In speaking, they hope to turn private pain into collective change across the lives of others with migraine.

It's time to understand.
It's time to speak.

Our tools and resources were informed by leading migraine experts to examine the total life impact of migraine. The Migraine Impact Assessment (MIA) Tool helps users create their own holistic, 360-day view of how migraine can affect them, and provides useful information they can share with their doctor.

Our Doctor Discussion Guide includes a list of questions that can help people with migraine frame a more informed and productive conversation about migraine with their doctor. Our resources for healthcare professionals approaches the conversation from the opposite perspective—helping educate caregivers about the full impact of migraine.

The articles we provide have been researched and written to help meet the unique needs of people with migraine, as well as the many friends and family who support them. Together, all these tools can help make it easier for people to “Speak Your Migraine” and for others to listen.

son Greene: 38 migraine-affected days per year

Jason G.

38 migraine-affected days per year

What's #SpeakYourMigraine?

What's #SpeakYourMigraine?

Jason

Jason G.

38 migraine-affected days per year

#SpeakYourMigraine is a global initiative sponsored by Amgen and Novartis to raise awareness of the total impact of migraine. While many focus largely on migraine attacks, our initiative aims to drive more understanding of the larger impacts of this disease at work, at home, among friends…everywhere. With better understanding, we find the words for better dialogue with others, especially doctors. The more we all speak, the better the situation for everyone with migraine.

What's Migraine?

Migraine is more than a headache. It is a distinct neurological disease that changes brain biology and function. We prefer to call it migraine—a singular condition—instead of migraines—because it's ever present and not just a series of attacks.

Monica Morino: 336+ migraine-affected days per year

Monica M.

336+ migraine-affected days per year

What's Migraine?

Migraine is more than a headache. It is a distinct neurological disease that changes brain biology and function. We prefer to call it migraine—a singular condition—instead of migraines—because it's ever present and not just a series of attacks.

Migraine is a long-term disabling disease that can profoundly impact someone’s ability to carry out everyday activities like attending family events or going to work. Migraine can also be difficult on family members—partners, parents, children and relatives.

Migraine is a complex neurological condition that is known to be widely misunderstood by parents, spouses, coworkers, friends and even doctors themselves.1 Despite it being deemed one of the 10 most disabling diseases in the world, by the World Health Organization, many people with migraine may still feel misunderstood and marginalized.2

What Can I Do?

Take advantage of the tools, resources and content available at this site. Visit #SpeakYourMigraine on Facebook to help turn private pain into collective change. Encourage others with migraine to reexamine their lives with migraine—then have more productive conversations with doctors, employers, teachers, students, family and friends.

Erica Carrasco: 336+ migraine-affected days per year

Erica C.

336+ migraine-affected days per year

What Can I Do?

Take advantage of the tools, resources and content available at this site. Visit #SpeakYourMigraine on Facebook to help turn private pain into collective change. Encourage others with migraine to reexamine their lives with migraine—then have more productive conversations with doctors, employers, teachers, students, family and friends.

For better understanding and more productive conversations, it’s time to #SpeakYourMigraine.

1. Young WB, Park JE, Tian IX, Kempner J. The stigma of migraine. PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54074. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0054074. Published January 16, 2013. Accessed July 2017
2. GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990 -2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Lancet. 2016;388(10053):1545-1602.